Make It Snow, Number One, and Get Lost

.: Of course, within hours of my previous post, it snowed in Edmonton. It was a light dusting, not enough to cover lawns, but the white stuff nonetheless. I’ll have pictures soon.

.: Did you watch Lost tonight, Episode #34, The 23rd Psalm? The element of science fiction was introduced – the “monster”, never seen but in the background in a number of episodes, appears to Eko and the Hobbit Charlie in the jungle. While Charlie sits in a tree, swirling black smoke, seemingly sentient and emitting a deep curdling techno-noise, emerges from the distant trees following two explosions, moving very fast and strong enough to destroy a tree in front of it as it speeds to within inches of Eko, then stopping on a virtual, airborne dime, hovering in front of him. The camera glides through the smoke as split-second images from Eko’s past appear from within the black cloud – is the smart smoke reading Eko’s mind, and sending the images back to the mother ship? After a few more seconds, it retreats at high speed and disappears back into the forest.

So this is what snatched the pilot from the cockpit and killed him, rustled the trees in the first episode, and tried to grab Locke and drag him away in another episode? I waited six weeks to see the big scary monster revealed to be black smoke? Might we see the monolith from 2001 in an upcoming episode as well? The creators of the show have (apparently) stated that the story would not have an sf angle as it unfolds. Well, unless there is a brilliant scientist, inventor, or engineer hiding on the island in an undisclosed location, or the black smoke is related to the Dharma Initiative (I know, it probably is), start the Hugo nomination voting now.

Suspend thy disbelief, my friends, the show can only get weirder and less believable (even with the required suspension of disbelief in the first place.) At the opening of the preceding (recap) episode tonight, the tail of the plane was shown slamming, and I mean SLAMMING into the ocean water at a speed that would have killed most if not everyone on board (assuming anyone could have survived the plane splitting apart in the air in the first place, and the subsequent descent of its parts into the ocean.) Instead, we accept that most survived without a scratch. (Remember the hijacked 767 that was forced to land on the ocean surface near the Comoros Islands in 1996? Six of the twelve crew members and 119 of the 163 passengers died. The crash was caught on video – watch it, and it becomes very difficult to accept the premise of Lost.) What’s happened to Danielle, the nutbag French woman? How is Desmond doing since he split the underground bunker to go hiking? Did a polar bear eat him? How are the sharks with the Dharma logo doing these days, and what happened to the Deliverance extras who kidnapped Walt at the end of Season One?

Part of me wants to think this is brilliant writing and a great story, but another part of me wants to slap the writers silly for adding so much improbability to the many threads in the show, which is becoming one multi-year cocktease. And yes, dammit, I will keep watching Lost.

3 Responses to “Make It Snow, Number One, and Get Lost”

  1. Tony Says:

    I am impressed with Lost. I think it compares well to any major network SF since the Twilight Zone and the Outer Limits. For much of the first season, I thought the sf was in the background, and that it was looking at the idea of inventing a civic culture, like Deadwood. The sf premises are being played up more. It think we are going to see some new clashes between Locke, who believes in his own perceptions – sometimes magical or paranormal – and Mr. Eko who reflects a religious perception. Meanwhile we have a bunch of people with some great compulsions and impulses running around. It still works.

  2. Fluffy Snakes Says:

    Ask a pilot. Crashing a jet into water is only slightly better than slamming into the side of a mountain. They’d rather take their chances with flat ground with any sort of obstacles. At least then, they have a chance of bouncing. A crash into water stops a plane in only a few feet. Three hundred miles an hour to zero in a couple seconds? Not many people will survive that.

    I did like the background story on Echo/Eko ‘though.

  3. James Says:

    “Instead, we accept that most survived without a scratch. (Remember the hijacked 767 that was forced to land on the ocean surface near the Comoros Islands in 1996? Six of the twelve crew members and 119 of the 163 passengers died. The crash was caught on video – watch it, and it becomes very difficult to accept the premise of Lost.)”

    If 119 of the 163 passengers died in the ’96-crash, doesn’t that still leave 44 survivors? That’s about the same number of survivors we have on Lost. So it’s really not that far fetched now is it?

    I don’t mean to ‘sound’ hostile but it’s a fictional TV-show so some content is bound to be implausible. I can live with that though, in fact I LOVE THIS FREAKIN’ SHOW !!!

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